Duneby: © Richard Castillo (3y expr.)
8.4
Overall
Rating
10
Subject
of photo
8
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
8
Focus
9
General
impression
9
Composition
& Perspective
7
Depth
of field
8
Color &
Lighting
Description
Been a long time since I've posted here. I'm trying to say something through particularly, the short wall of wind-tossed sand in the middle & very upper part of the frame. It seems to me to be in a kind of motion, even though it's a still p  see all >
Been a long time since I've posted here. I'm trying to say something through particularly, the short wall of wind-tossed sand in the middle & very upper part of the frame. It seems to me to be in a kind of motion, even though it's a still photo. Maybe moving the viewer into something or somewhere beyond. Overall I want to help transport the viewer into some other, still & quiet place. I deliberately put the foreground out of focus. Tech info: Hasselblad 501CM, Zeiss 80mm f/2.8, Shot @ f/5.6, Kod
Technical Details

Camera: Select

Lens: Prime: Fixed focal length
Date and time: 30 Nov -0001 00:00
Flash: None
Original size: 1500px X 1500px
Software: Adobe Photoshop CS6 (Windows)
Reviewed by GuruShots Pro
Sara Constança
20+ Years
Portugal
Artistic
282 Jobs
A pro shooter full time since 93 covering a wide array of subjects and techniques, Sara is a seasoned photographer w...
General
impression
Hi Richard, It's nice to see a 120 film shot for a change! There is a bit of dust and that is not very flattering but I can appreciate it, specially when most photographs I see today look like they were waxed. I can see where you're going with this but it might be a bit of a stretch, because what you say is wind — which looks to me it could be a very small tornado forming on the dune — for the usual person would probably look like there is some issue with the 'sensor'. Most people won't notice this is actually film. The camera used, wonderful camera by the way, love it!, is a giveaway, but what tells me this is film is the type of grain and dust on the surface when scanned. It could be done to look like that but my guess is this is really film. Although finding a few issues here I have to give you 9 as general impression for the subject and equipment used. I would certainly enjoy seeing this in printed big size on a gallery wall. May I ask you where this is? Cheers
9/10
Subject
of photo
This is probably my favorite subject! Well done for that. I have a series of my own shot in the Moroccan desert. It's the best place to work.
10/10
Composition
& perspective
I would probably have a bit more of sky in the frame but I like this as it is and feel it helps with the mystery of what lies ahead.
9/10
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
I don't know about the speed but is clearly to me you know what you're doing.
8/10
Depth
of field
For your desired effect I would recommend a lower DoF.
7/10
Color &
Lighting
I love the sand colour but am not too sure about the sky. The light shadow effect is subtle but exquisite.
8/10
Focus
Focus is right and good for the goal you're going for, to bad the DoF is not helping you achieve that.
8/10
How to improve your photo
1.
You failed to mention the speed. It's not fundamental and I can see that you know what you're doing but still, the most information I get the better I can help. Also, and this is very important for me, you're not saying anything about the film used, the ISO you shot and development details.
2.
There is some strange effect on the line that separates the sand from the sky and the sand has a type of saturation that feels not very consistent with the sky. Did you add sharpening to this after scanned? Or, did you darkened the sky a bit? There is something there that doesn't feel right to me and makes this look like a montage. If it is a montage it's OK, but still, this is ambiguous... I like ambiguity but sometimes it's just strange and feels their might be something wrong.
3.
The foreground defocus is a good way to force the viewer to go forward and imagine what is beyond the dune but as I see it this is not defocused enough to relay the viewer into the background. It starts by feeling the focus is in the wrong place. I would use it at f2.8 for the decreased DoF. When having the foreground defocused enough one thinks it's made on purpose, but if the area you want to bring out of focus, in order to select what is in focus, is still close to focus, then it looks like it could be a mistake and the objective of leading the viewer to the background sand is not so effective. I don't mind this sort of ambiguity but for it to work it would need to be consistent with other examples on a show. This is clearly aimed at Fine Art Photography.
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Sara Constança
Experience: 20+ Years
A pro shooter full time since 93 covering a wide array of subjects and techniques, Sara is a seasoned photographer with both commercial and art projects of mention. Studio to outdoors, quiet still life or dynamic situations, all sorts of high quality results, she's experienced a lot of what one...
Specialty:
Artistic, Documentary, Black & White, People, Adventure
Location:
Portugal
Jobs: 282 Jobs
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