Do it yourself shrineby: © Bob Costall (20+y expr.)
8.8
Overall
Rating
9
Subject
of photo
NA
Use of camera,
exposure
& speed
8
Focus
8
General
impression
8
Composition
& Perspective
10
Depth
of field
10
Color &
Lighting
Description
The attached photo was taken about three hours after sunrise which, in Cambodia, means the sun is already fairly high in the sky. Buddhism is a part of everyday life in Cambodia. Families and businesses often have professionally built shrin  see all >
The attached photo was taken about three hours after sunrise which, in Cambodia, means the sun is already fairly high in the sky. Buddhism is a part of everyday life in Cambodia. Families and businesses often have professionally built shrines in or in front of their buildings. What caught my eye in this instance was the "homemade" shrine in front of the colourful door. Iā€™d manually set the shutter speed and aperture and let the ISO float because I was photographing at an outdoor market going in
Technical Details

X-E1

Lens: XF18-55mmF2.8-4 R LM OIS
Exposure time: 1/250 sec ,Manual ,Manual
F-stop: F8
ISO: 320
Focal length: 26.5 mm
White balance: Custom
Exposure program: Manual
Metering mode: Multi-segment
Date and time: 04 Apr 2017 19:59
Flash: Off, Did not fire
Original size: 3157px X 4735px
Software: Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 6.9 (Windows)
Reviewed by GuruShots Pro
Don Mace
20+ Years
United States
Nature
341 Jobs
I have been joyfully capturing images for over 35 years. My formative years were spent shooting 35mm film and/or sl...
General
impression
Bob, this image is very nicely done. It is warm, artistic and pretty well balanced. The tonal quality and light are its strong points. There are some things I think you might consider, particularly in post processing, to bring out the power of your image.
8/10
Subject
of photo
This photo is less about the individual objects in it than the mood the juxtaposition of the objects to each other creates. The soft beauty of the makeshift shrine contrasted to the rustic state of arrested decay of the surroundings works well here.
9/10
Composition
& perspective
I think the placement of the primary subjects here works pretty well. The table and shrine objects are set to the lower left third of the frame and there is some shadow detail moving from lower frame diagonally to move the eye into the frame somewhat. I think the post on the left side margin is somewhat distracting and breaks the compositional flow somewhat.
8/10
Depth
of field
Fine
10/10
Color &
Lighting
The lighting and color here are very nice. The slanting light from above creates dramatic shadows and contrast in the scene and the colors are rich and saturated to the extent that they create a very painterly and artistic image. There is a renaissance mood to the image that is warm and inviting and reminiscent something that may have been painted by some old Dutch Master.
10/10
Focus
I think the table and shrine are just a little soft. Its sometimes difficult to tell on low resolution versions of the original, but to me they appear soft.
8/10
How to improve your photo
1.
As I mentioned in the compositional portion of the review, the post on the left side of the frame doesn't do much for the composition. You don't have a lot of options sometimes when shooting an image other than to change your point of view to eliminate foreground or framing objects that don't work well. But in this case you can pretty easily clone the post out in post processing using lightroom or photoshop and thus remove a minor distraction.
2.
Consider using a tool like the radial adjustment tool to focus attention on the shrine. You can do this by using the tool to select an oblong selection around the shrine that mimics the direction of the light source and then darken the exposure of the surrounding area to make the shrine glow a bit brighter and set it off from the background a bit more. This simple adjustmet will create a bit more drama and power to your image I think.
3.
Depending upon your comfort level with creating an image as opposed to taking one, consider removing some of the detriment from the floor and the wall to sort of clean up the composition so that the most powerful influences on the viewer are the lighting, contrast and major forms. For instance you can easily take out a couple of the dark objects on the wall to the right of the door, the garbage bag under the table, and a few distracting minor objects laying around behind the table. However if you are tied to the idea of creating a more journalistic, faithful to the actual scene, sort of image then by all means leave those in. I just think for presentation you lose nothing by altering the 'reality' of the image in that small way.
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Don Mace
Experience: 20+ Years
I have been joyfully capturing images for over 35 years. My formative years were spent shooting 35mm film and/or slide transparencies. My workflow is now totally digital. I primarily shoot nature, scenic, landscapes, architectural, macro and, now and then, people. I am viscerally drawn to simp...
Specialty:
Nature, Travel, Artistic, Black & White, Panoramic
Location:
United States
Jobs: 341 Jobs
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